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26
Sep
2014

Getting a Bit Fitter – Step by Step

POSTED BY Analyst Team

I have been wearing a Fitbit One device for the past week in an attempt to learn more about how much I really move in a day as well as to get some motivation to do more.

Announced in September 2012, the device is an update to the Fitbit Ultra. It promises to track the steps I take, the distance I walk throughout the day, calories burned, floors climbed and, if I am willing to deal with the slight discomfort of sleeping with the device attached to aI have been wearing a Fitbit One device for the past week in an attempt to learn more about how much I really move in a day as well as to get some motivation to do more.

Announced in September 2012, the device is an update to the Fitbit Ultra. It promises to track the steps I take, the distance I walk throughout the day, calories burned, floors climbed and, if I am willing to deal with the slight discomfort of sleeping with the device attached to my wrist, it monitors my sleep quality and wakes me in the morning with a gentle vibration (Silent Wake Alarm). To give me an easy and quick feedback on how well I do, a flower is displayed on the screen which grows or shrinks based on my recent activity or inactivity. Fitbit was also the first wireless activity tracker that synced with a smartphone or computer via Bluetooth, giving the user a more detailed analysis on a bigger screen. Besides tracking exercise and daily activity, the accompanying app allows me to connect with friends who also use Fitbit and share and compare results in real time.

Overall, the device is quite neat and useful for anyone who wants to keep tabs on how active they are. I checked it against other apps to compare how accurately it measured distances or calorie counts and it performed surprisingly well. The one thing that did not impress me so much was its sleep tracking function. The Fitbit One gave me feedback on how much it thought I slept and how many times I woke or became restless during the night but did not tell anything about the quality or stages of my sleep. Also, I did not completely agree with the device in terms of the amount of time I spent asleep.

The market for similar wearable devices that offer a convenient and fun way of measuring our activities, vital signs and therefore helping us develop a healthier daily routine is expected to grow strongly over the next few years, reaching $53bn in hardware sales by 2019. As observed by Juniper Research’s recent report on Smart Wearable Devices, which covers Fitness devices, Glasses, Watches, Multimedia, Clothing, Jewelry, Healthcare & Enterprise applications, there is an increasingly crowded market of wearables, where, besides many start-ups and small businesses, key players, such as Google and Samsung, have started to weigh in with their own platforms. Despite the increasingly abundant supply, consumers, however, are still unsure about the use case for many of the wearables they are being offered.

Juniper expects that in the coming years many of these technologies will be developed and launched for enterprise and healthcare uses where they have a clearer use. Consumer mass adoption will come later, when manufacturers overcome the ‘technology first’ attitude and start thinking in terms of functionality and consumer benefits.my wrist, it monitors my sleep quality and wakes me in the morning with a gentle vibration (Silent Wake Alarm). To give me an easy and quick feedback on how well I do, a flower is displayed on the screen which grows or shrinks based on my recent activity or inactivity. Fitbit was also the first wireless activity tracker that synced with a smartphone or computer via Bluetooth, giving the user a more detailed analysis on a bigger screen. Besides tracking exercise and daily activity, the accompanying app allows me to connect with friends who also use Fitbit and share and compare results in real time.

Overall, the device is quite neat and useful for anyone who wants to keep tabs on how active they are. I checked it against other apps to compare how accurately it measured distances or calorie counts and it performed surprisingly well. The one thing that did not impress me so much was its sleep tracking function. The Fitbit One gave me feedback on how much it thought I slept and how many times I woke or became restless during the night but did not tell anything about the quality or stages of my sleep. Also, I did not completely agree with the device in terms of the amount of time I spent asleep.

The market for similar wearable devices that offer a convenient and fun way of measuring our activities, vital signs and therefore helping us develop a healthier daily routine is expected to grow strongly over the next few years, reaching $53bn in hardware sales by 2019. As observed by Juniper Research’s recent report on Smart Wearable Devices, which covers Fitness devices, Glasses, Watches, Multimedia, Clothing, Jewelry, Healthcare & Enterprise applications, there is an increasingly crowded market of wearables, where, besides many start-ups and small businesses, key players, such as Google and Samsung, have started to weigh in with their own platforms. Despite the increasingly abundant supply, consumers, however, are still unsure about the use case for many of the wearables they are being offered.

Juniper expects that in the coming years many of these technologies will be developed and launched for enterprise and healthcare uses where they have a clearer use. Consumer mass adoption will come later, when manufacturers overcome the ‘technology first’ attitude and start thinking in terms of functionality and consumer benefits.